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Teen Dead, Officers Injured In Shooting, Community Sorrow

May 10th, 2017 · 24 Comments · Law Enforcement, News and Events

police-involved shooting

Photo courtesy of Doing It Local.

Update here. A teen is dead, another male wounded and three officers suffered injuries following a police-involved shooting Tuesday afternoon. State law enforcement, as is protocol, has taken over the investigation. “Relatives have identified the dead teen as 16-year-old Jayson Negron, of Bridgeport. His passenger, 21-year-old Julian Fyffe, the grandson of a decorated city police officer, was shot in the shoulder and is expected to make a full recovery.”

Two reports follow, first from Doing It Local and then CT Post:

Police attempted to pull over stolen car on Laurel Avenue with two occupants inside. The car sped towards Park Avenue. Another police car was responding coming from Washington Avenue and then the stolen vehicle turned into the Walgreen’s parking lot at 1000 Park Avenue. The vehicle then turned left onto Fairfield Avenue the wrong way when it struck a car. According to detectives the stolen vehicle rammed two police officers. The officer(s) (unknown if it was both or just one) opened fire into the windshield of the car. The driver died of his injuries and the passenger was shot with non-life threatening injuries. One officer was transported by police car to St. Vincent’s Hospital. Detectives said the officers received non-life threatening injuries.

Later in the evening a group from New Haven’s Black Lives Matter Chapter came to the Bridgeport Police Station on Congress Street to protest. When there was no audience there they moved the protest to Park Avenue and Fairfield Avenue. They remained there past 1am. State Police earlier called for K-9 from across the state to assemble at Troop G in the event of protest. At 2:10am they reported on the statewide hotline to other police departments that the situation had calmed down.

More here.

CT Post coverage:

“The identity of the operator is pending positive identification,” a State Police spokesman Sgt. Eric Haglund said in a statement Wednesday. “The identities of the Bridgeport Police Officers are being withheld at this time.”

The chase started around 5:00 p.m. after Bridgeport Police officers tried to stop a car that had been reported stolen, according to State Police. According to the account, the chase ended on Fairfield Avenue with the car stopping.

“As the Bridgeport officers approached, the operator of the stolen vehicle accelerated in reverse and struck at least one (officer),” Haglund said. “As a result, a second Bridgeport Police Officer fired at least one round from their duty weapon, striking both the operator and front seat passenger.

More here.

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24 Comments so far ↓

  • Steven Auerbach

    I am confused. Why would a group from New Haven Black lives matter come to Bridgeport to protest ??? The police were doing their job and were injured. WTF. It is sad . I am grateful I was not at that Walgreens parking lot or driving on Fairfield Avenue. Just another wasted life. Bad decisions. All lives matter and the death of this young man and the families of these wounded police officers have to deal with this reality – They did their job. In Bridgeport their job is that much harder.

  • Donald Day

    Having a sister that is a retired Bridgeport police officer it is a common practice that whenever there is a police involved shooting police officers involved ALWAYS go to the hospital as injured. ALWAYS.

  • Vale la Pena

    Ok Donald Duck having a retarded police officer sister makes you an expert on police involved shootings.
    Last night Black Lives Matter claim to have a video of the individuals in the car with their hands up and out the window.
    WHERE IS IT?
    They claim to have multiple witnesses?
    WHERE ARE THEY?
    When approached by the State Police they started chanting…. Nobody talks……
    The driver didn’t have a weapon.
    What do you call a 3000 pounds + car when is coming towards you?
    Go tell all the victims of terror attacks that a vehicle is not a weapon.
    I’M JUST SAYING!!!!!!!!!!

  • Donald Day

    I’m gong to assume you meant I have a retired police officer sister and not retarded. In case you didn’t let me say fuck you.

  • Harvey Weintraub

    Gee,if this happened in 2015,Joe would bring a photog with him and have a pic taken with him kneeling over the body and praying…

  • DougDavidoff

    The Hartford Courant posted a new story about this crime and the police-action shooting at 2:38 p.m. today. The headline is “Drive Shot, Killed After Hitting Bridgeport Officer; Protests Planned.” The URL is:
    http://www.courant.com/breaking-news/hc-bridgeport-officer-involved-shooting-0510-20170509-story.html

    Datelined from Bridgeport, the story is written by Nicholas Rondinone with assistance from Rebecca Lure. It contains information from Chief Perez, Mayor Ganim, state investigatory and prosecutorial officials, and the Stratford school superintendent, who reports that rumors are rife (though unconfirmed) that the dead driver is a Stratford student.

    The story also reports that protests are planned for tonight and presents a timeline of protests last night. I’m not sure about the New Haven references in the comments above because the protesters are largely local (I know this from my personal social media feeds) but are led in part by Bishop John Selders of Amistad United Church of Christ in Hartford.

    The Right Reverend Dr. Selders is the leader of the Moral Monday CT movement centered in Hartford and the I-91 corridor. See:
    http://www.MoralMondayCT.org
    And John Selders’ bio at:
    http://amistaducc.org/wordpress/the-ministry-team/bishop-john-selders-jr-pastor/
    And his Twitter feed at:
    https://twitter.com/bishopjselders

    Bishop Selders has been in Bridgeport many times during the past year to speak out on human rights issues and build coalition with civil rights organizers in the Park City and in Fairfield County. He may find that the circumstances of this tragedy — the alleged use of the stolen car as a weapon, with an officer pinned beneath it — limit public sympathy for the deceased. But the question of whether a life needed to be taken is always paramount, and the question of whether a life was taken due to bias is also paramount. The answers are not necessarily established no matter what any of us thinks we see at this stage. That is why a thorough investigation is needed. Public pressure to press for an investigation that is open and unfettered is an appropriate end, whether or not any of us agrees with the means. We can each can make assumptions and judgements about the truth in the here and now, but only an investigation and a published report can tell us all in the end the exhaustive details of how and why this crime turned into loss of a young life, and whether the police shooting was justified. In the meantime, I shall pray for the deceased and his loved ones as well as for the police officers who protect the Park City day and day out, especially in this dangerous and deadly year decimating lives, communities, security, and futures.

  • Tom White

    Here is part of what the ACLU had to say:

    “Police have killed another person in Connecticut, and another community is struggling to receive answers about what happened. How many people have to die or be seriously injured at the hands of law enforcement before Connecticut strengthens its laws to hold police accountable to the communities they are supposed to serve?,” McGuire said.

    This is why ‘black lives matter’, the ACLU and certain ‘reverends’ have little or no credibility and why there will be little sympathy for the ‘youth’ who was killed while assaulting the police officers.

  • Pete Spain

    The reported events of yesterday turned deadly. Utterly tragic. The state investigation must uncover why.

    This brings to mind what Bobby Kennedy spoke of, in response to the awful news of the assassination of Dr Martin Luther King, Jr:

    My favorite poet was Aeschylus. He wrote: “In our sleep, pain which cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart until, in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom through the awful grace of God.”

    What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence or lawlessness; but love and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country, whether they be white or they be black.

    So I shall ask you tonight to return home, to say a prayer for the family of Martin Luther King, that’s true, but more importantly to say a prayer for our own country, which all of us love–a prayer for understanding and that compassion of which I spoke.

    We can do well in this country. We will have difficult times; we’ve had difficult times in the past; we will have difficult times in the future. It is not the end of violence; it is not the end of lawlessness; it is not the end of disorder.

    But the vast majority of white people and the vast majority of black people in this country want to live together, want to improve the quality of our life, and want justice for all human beings who abide in our land.

    Let us dedicate ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to tame the savageness of man and make gentle the life of this world.
    Let us dedicate ourselves to that, and say a prayer for our country and for our people.years ago: to tame the savageness of man and make gentle the life of this world.

    Let us dedicate ourselves to that, and say a prayer for our country and for our people.

    • DougDavidoff

      Thank you for that extended quotation, Pete.

      Those words were spoken on April 4, 1968, on the Near Northside of Indianpolis. RFK was campaigning in Indiana that day for the primary to be held a month later. The park where he spoke is close to both of the houses I lived in during my 23 years in Indy. It is one of the most sacred places on the map of my life.

      Video and text of RFK speech.
      http://kennedykingindy.org/#thespeech-section

      I often use RFK’s Aeschylus quotation in condolence notes.

      RFK’s address, witnessed by hundreds of Hoosiers but recorded by two just journalists — one local radio reporter and one local television videographer as the Indy dailies’ newsrooms were under orders from the publisher to ignore RFK — is counted among the finest extemporaneous speeches in U.S. history. We will observe the 50th anniversary of the speech, as well as the 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s assassination, next April 4th, 2018.

      People arriving at the park that night for the planned RFK presidential rally were just hearing of MLK’s death. News did not travel fast in those days. Many people came prepared to cheer Bobby Kennedy to victory in the Indiana primary, as crowds had done earlier that day in Fort Wayne and Muncie. Instead, RFK shocked the crowd with news that MLK had been shot and died in Memphis. In the recordings, you can hear campaign cheers, whoops, and hollers subside as RFK’s sad news permeates the consciousness of the crowd.

      That night changed the lives of Hoosiers I came to know during my years as a New Englander living in Indiana, 1983-2006.
      – Julia Carson, age 29, became district director for U.S. Rep. Andy Jacobs Jr. She was also a business executive, a clothing retailer, and a state senator from Indianapolis. As he announced his retirement, Andy Jacobs (maybe the finest congressional rep I have known) anointed Julia to succeed him. She ran, won, and became the first African-American and first woman to represent Indianapolis in Congress. Her nephew, Andre Carson, holds that congressional seat today. He is one of two Muslims serving in the Congress.
      – Ted Boehm, also age 29, committed his life to public service. He retired from 14 years as a justice on the Indiana Supreme Court.
      – Rozelle Boyd was a young school teacher at the rally. That fall, he won election as the first African-American on the Indianapolis City-County Council and served as Democratic caucus leader for decades.
      – Paul Cantwell was at various times a Marion County commissioner, city council representative, state legislator, and another aide to Rep. Jacobs. His daughter, Maria Cantwell, moved to Seattle and serves today as United States Senator from Washington State.
      – Billie Beaux, a young teacher, became an advocate for hiring African-American teachers into Indianapolis schools and integrating the public school faculty. She became a longtime state legislator and later the Marion County auditor.
      – William Crawford was a young postal worker. He quit his job after MLK’s death and RFK’s speech, taking up community organizing for the Black Radical Action Project. He was elected to the Indiana House of Representatives, serving 40 years from 1972 to 2012. His leadership and influence were extraordinary.
      – Theresa Lubbers is the only Republican on this list. She attended the rally while a college student. Inspired by RFK, she became a high school English teacher and then served Richard G. Luga,r first in Lugar’s mayoral staff and then as deputy press secretary when Lugar, also a Republican, was elected to the United States Senate. She is now Commissioner of Higher Education in Indiana.
      – RFK’s staff at the Indianapolis rally included John Lewis, now U.S. representative from Georgia; and Frank Makiewicz, who was RFK’s press secretary and went on to lead the Peace Corps and National Public Radio. He also directed Senator George McGovern’s 1972 campaign for the presidency.

      On May 14, 1994, President Bill Clinton went to the site, now named “Martin Luther King Park,” to break ground for a monument to peace. Funded by the foundation of the Indiana Pacers NBA team, the monument would be constructed of the metal resulting from melting guns confiscated by Indianapolis Police. The groundbreaking was attended by U.S. Senator Ted Kennedy; RFK’s widow, Ethel Skakel Kennedy; and two sons of MLK: Dexter Scott King and Martin Luther King III.

      I was also there that day.

      The memorial from the melted guns was created by a 33-year-old Hoosier artist and features silhouettes of RFK and MLK reaching out to each other, but not quite able to touch. The path through the memorial takes visitors between the two leaders, filling the space that they cannot fill because their hands don’t touch.

      One of my dreams for Bridgeport is that the Park City would also melt down guns confiscated from criminals and use the resulting molten metal to cast our own monument to peace — at Baldwin Plaza, at Seaside Park, at McLevy Green, or perhaps in a park located in a place where one day — as RFK did in Indianapolis — sudden and unexpected violence that shears the hearts of the community might be renounced in the strongest, poetic, and most inspirational of terms, as RFK did. Perhaps that has not yet happened in Bridgeport. You tell me.

      What would such a monument represent? What would it look like?I I leave that to the artists and visionaries of tomorrow. I’d just like to look at it and see hundreds of pounds, if not tons, of metal formed from melting down guns no longer in our community.

      Resources:
      Kennedy-King Memorial Initiative, now preparing for next year’s 50th anniversary observances of MLK’s death and RFK’s death.
      http://www.KennedyKingIndy.org
      Wikipedia’s excellent article on “Landmark for Peace Memorial,” including photos of the memorial
      Map showing location of MLK Park and Kennedy-King Landmark for Peace Memorial on Near Northside of Indianapolis, Indiana
      https://www.evernote.com/l/ABFtzBM0Pg9BOLEpXq17qrURErzR2s2BUxg

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Landmark_for_Peace_Memorial

  • Robert Teixeira

    Here’s the problem in all of this, it’s not the cops, criminals, or the citizens’ concerns on either position, for enforcement or against them. No side is wrong in a way. It’s not about if cop has to take a life. We give them guns for a reason.

    Cops have to understand that when incidents like these are seen, people don’t believe them.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dojLoKglmnY

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EmQIXO330SI

    A Cop’s job maybe to protect and serve however to them they want to make sure they don’t get killed or hurt in the process. They want to make it home to their family and love ones. It is a job that provides for the family, not martyrdom. Citizens have to understand cops have to deal with things like this

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PnUYKFU0OqM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JzAiv4vi5Gg

    The problems lies in the department able to communicate to the public that they are here to protect and sever. Their job is serious, between life and death, in some situations. Each side has to understand this, ultimately other than the anarchist, citizens and cops have to be in the side of a righteous kill, if they are not then they are anarchists doing harm to both citizens and cops, who are seeking justice for some mother or father on any other family member who they have lost in a tragedy of policing.

    It’s not if a cop has to take a life to protect their own or someone else, it’s if the kill was righteous, body cameras would have shed greater light on what happen.
    Police are not trusted, and they have to have the benefit of the doubt. While cops have to make split second calls in their job, they are not umpires in a game, their calls are sometime between life and death, either their own or someone else.

    If Bridgeport officers were given body cameras this continues anarchism of mistrusted would end and justice would be conveyed, to some greater degree.

    Without law AND order, we end up like this.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pVJj1xYPS0

    Good luck people.

    BAM I AM OUT

  • Bob Walsh

    I am having a hard time understanding our Chief of Police AJ Perez. He said that the rookie officer was being sucked under the car AND YET he fired three or five shots through the back window and killed and wounded that occupants of the car.
    What does sucked under the car mean?

  • Wingnut

    Where did this 16 year old go to school. How were his grades. Was he involved in sports? Or was his hobby just stealing cars and hanging out on the streets. Show us more of how he was a “good kid”! Sounds like another lost soul. Poorly educated with no values or discipline. I blame his parents. Your children are your responsibility and his actions dictate how you as parents raised him. Prove me wrong!

  • Robert Teixeira

    Here’s the problem in all of this, it’s not the cops, criminals, or the citizens’ concerns on either position, either for law enforcement or against them. No side is wrong in a way. It’s not about if cop has to take a life. We give them guns for a reason.
    Cops have to understand that when incidents like these are seen, people don’t believe them.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dojLoKglmnY

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EmQIXO330SI

    A Cop’s job maybe to protect and serve however to them they want to make sure they don’t get killed or hurt in the process. They want to make it home to their family and love ones. It is a job that provides for their family, not martyrdom. Citizens have to understand cops have to deal with things like this.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PnUYKFU0OqM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JzAiv4vi5Gg

    The problem lies in the department’ ability to communicate to the public that they are here to protect and sever. Their job is serious, between life and death in some situations. each side has to understand this. Ultimately other than the anarchist, citizens and cops have to be in the side of a righteous kill, if they are not then they are anarchists themselves doing harm to both citizens and the cops, who are seeking justice for some mother or father or any other family member who they may have lost in a tragedy in policing.

    It’s not if a cop has to take a life to protect their own or someone else, it’s if the kill was righteous, body cameras would have shed greater light on what happen.
    Police are not trusted, and they have to have the benefit of the doubt. While cops have to make split second calls in their job, they are not umpires in ball game, their calls are sometime between life and death, either their own or someone else.

    If Bridgeport officers (law enforcement) were given body cameras this continues anarchism of mistrusted would end and justice would be conveyed, to some greater degree.
    Without law AND order, we end up like this.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pVJj1xYPS0

    Good luck people.

    BAM I AM OUT

  • Frank Gyure

    Where is Mayor Joseph Ganim? A “mayor” is supposed to be a leader within the local community.The most basic and “closest” form of government.

  • Ron Mackey

    The Connecticut Post article stated, “Many people who attended the press conference expressed outrage that the 16-year-old lay handcuffed and uncovered in the street nearly six hours after the shooting.”
    Here is the lesson that Bridgeport didn’t learn, Ferguson, Missouri following the shooting of an Michael Brown by a white officers in 2014, they let Michael Brown body to stay in the street for over six hour uncovered. This is a failure in police policy, there are portable tents that police dept. use and they do not interfere with any investigation.

  • Bob Walsh

    Again, Ganim’s Chief of Police says he was told not to touch him.
    But that does not imply that you can not shield him from pulic viewing by using a tent to provide some degree of privacy.

  • Stringfellow

    I would like to begin my post with condolences to the Negron family. Words can’t say enough.

    Where is the protest over the senseless murders that take place across this country everyday? I hate to think that no one seems to care unless someone is killed at the hands of the police where they become some martyr. Which give rise to protests and anger.

    Does anyone know the latest body count in Chicago?

    Where is the protest over the shaken baby in the Green Homes?

    Where is the protest over the murder of Kyree Kennedy last week?

    Where is the protest of the two males who were firing a gun on Union Avenue on May 2nd, 2017 at 12:30 in the AFTERNOON? Has any of the community leaders picked up the phone and called the Chief of Police, the Mayor or 911 to report this?

    Crickets.

    Yet once again there is the rush to judgment of the police and the way they responded to a potential deadly force encounter before the facts are in. What were they supposed to do?

    It’s tragic this young man is gone but it’s time to lay the responsibility at the feet of those who make a poor decisions. There have been many bad shootings at the hands of the police but until this can be proven this one of them, let cooler heads prevail and see where things go. Let’s not pull the race card as the first club out of the bag. It’s time to redirect the anger and get to the root of the problem.

  • DougDavidoff

    I feel compelled to add something else to this discussion. Events do not happen in a vacuum, and the Bridgeport police-action shooting and resulting protests happened at a time of intense questioning and introspection among at least some white allies of civil rights and #BlackLivesMatter in Connecticut.

    The discussion began a few days ago — before the Park Avenue tragedy — and was initiated by the #MyMusings series of social media posts by the Rev. Dr. John Selders of Hartford, leader of Moral Monday CT and leader of protests in Bridgeport.

    In the week or so prior to Park Avenue, Rev. Selders questioned the right relationships of blacks and whites dedicated to the civil rights, civil liberties, social changes, #BlackLivesMatter and #MoralMondayCT causes.

    Selders mused that whites — even whites in alliance with #MoralMondayCT and #BlackLivesMatter — were and are nonetheless continuing in privileged presumption about their quality of leadership versus black leadership. It is the latest iteration of an internal split in civil rights leadership which occasionally rises to the surface. It is also entirely appropriate in my view for even the most dedicated antiracists among whites to check their level of racism. I think this is what Selders seeks.

    Bridgeport happened as this milieu of questioning among black leaders and responses from white leaders in Connecticut civil rights was becoming quite a rich conversation online.

    By introducing this underlying topic of discussion which occurred in the days prior to Park Avenue, I hope add a new layer of context for the events in our city beyond what we’ve all seen and heard and read in the media. Antiracist trainings have been occurring in Bridgeport. Yet even as many whites speak out, they are being called upon and called out by black leaders to look deeply within.

    Thus, just as protesters black and white ask for tough questions to be asked about Park Avenue, Rev. Selders looks at white allies (I include myself) and has been saying (and I stress that I paraphrase here): “Who are you to presume you lead or lead well? Can you take leadership from blacks? Where is your racism today? Where do you think it is? And then, where is it, truly?”

    This means: Investigate ourselves, even as we call for investigation into Park Avenue.

    Example: A May 5th Facebook post from Rev. Selders:
    “Not interested in conversations with fragile white folks these days! Please talk to someone other than me, right now!!! #growthehellup However, I am ready to go deep with white folks who’ve done some work on their own. #mymusings”:
    This drew 232 reactions including several from Bridgeport and 29 comments, many from whites I know (and one from me).

    Also on May 5th:
    “As long as there are arrogant self righteous white folks who continue to claim they are doing racial justice work while not taking what I’m saying seriously….I along with many others will continue to use our agency to call them on their “bad behavior”. #mymusings”
    This drew 82 reactions and nine comments.

    This May 5th post:
    “Why do white folks believe that creating groups and organizations around racial justice work is better to do than those same white folk coming alongside and joining black led groups and organizations doing the same thing? It seems to me to be a very interesting question that when posed to white folk engaged in these groups is left unanswered. Might it be the very premise reeks of a kind of sophisticated neo-liberal white supremacist behavior we’ve all been trained to accepted as normal…
    “Where does the distrust of black leadership lay? How often is black leadership disrespected? How many times do black folk have to say this is wrong before our ‘white friends’ believe what we are saying? #mymusings”

    That post drew a response from a seminary professor in Ohio:
    “I’ve experienced this phenomenon in a few ways: either they will over perform in predominantly black people spaces, or they will shrink and talk about how ‘afraid’ they are to offer up their gifts so as not to offend. What’s wrong with the question, ‘what do you want me to do, leader?’ And then, do that, without your ‘expert commentary’ on how you would do it differently. This justice work is rough, partly because of what Bishop John Selders lifts up here.”

    I took it as somewhat ameliorating or forgiving (but that’s my projection, actually) this May 7th post from John Selders:
    “I discovered, again through worship, that an experience of unity among peoples can be more compelling than all that separates and divides.” It’s a quotation from The Rev. Dr. Howard Thurman, theologian and dean for many years of Rankin Chapel at Howard University and then dean of Marsh Chapel at Boston University.

    On May 7, Rev. Selders frankly knocked me for a loop when he posted a link to a HuffPost article by DiDi Delgado of #BlackLivesMatter in Cambridge, Massachusetts, which HuffPost had reposted from Ms. Delgado’s Medium.com webpage. Because the article is far more readable in the Medium.com format where the author composed it, I’m including the HuffPost link but I recommend readers use the Medium.com link to appreciate the original context of the article.

    The Delgado article is entitled, “Whites Only: SURJ and the Caucasian Invasion of Racial Justice Spaces.” Ms. Delgado’s sub-headline on Medium is: “White-led racial justice groups have displayed problematic behavior, lack of accountability, and outright anti-Blackness.” HuffPost rewrote the sub-headline to read: “Anti-racism work with a white lens is inherently flawed.”

    Delgado article in original Medium.com format:
    https://theestablishment.co/whites-only-the-caucasian-invasion-of-racial-justice-spaces-7e2529ec8314
    The same article reformatted and reposted by HuffPost, from which it was linked by Rev. Selders:
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/whites-only-surj-and-the-caucasian-invasion-of-racial_us_58dd5cf7e4b04ba4a5e25209

  • Mojo

    *** For those of us that we’re not there @ the actual scene when it happen , it would be wise to wait for more info. and the State Police Investigation Report before just making up shit or going on here-say! *** People were injured & died, so I’ll wait for “facts” !***

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