Hispanics Seek Return On Political Investment From Lamont

State Senator Dennis Bradley

In politics, to the victors go the spoils, but some constituencies are more spoiled than others, and the governor is hearing about it.

Governor Ned Lamont’s nascent administration is hearing from leaders of a key voting bloc that buoyed his November win–Hispanics–lobbying for key appointments.

In Bridgeport, Connecticut’s most populous city, Hispanics are finding their voice by flexing greater turnout by sheer numbers. State Rep. Chris Rosario and new State Senator Dennis Bradley are pressing Lamont and his people about the overwhelming electoral percentage in his favor in the cause of an administration that reflects the support he received.

A quick check of key Hispanic voting precincts such as Marin, Barnum and Johnson shows that Lamont enjoyed roughly 90 percent of the vote against his Republican challenger Bob Stefanowski.

“Let’s not be blind to the facts,” said Sen. Dennis Bradley, D-Bridgeport, a caucus member. “Those urban cities vote almost entirely Democrat, so now that we have a Democratic governor, if that portion of the population is the reason why you hold that seat, then you should obviously have somebody there who can tell you what the needs and wants and desires are.”

Bradley, on a legislative level, has elevated quickly to a role of influence as the Senate chair of the Public Safety Committee, the battleground for commercial gaming expansion in the state. Bradley is of Mexican and Dominican heritage.

For Rosario, of Puerto Rican descent, it’s all about a return on investment. “The governor campaigned on diversity and we want to make sure that our participation creates opportunities for others.”

State Rep. Chris Rosario

In January, Rosario was appointed Deputy Speaker by Speaker of the House Joe Aresimowicz. He was recently appointed co-chair of the Census Committee. He also served a term as House chair of the Black and Puerto Rican Caucus that’s pressing Lamont on the hires, a group that’s juggling its own geographic identity and provincial rivalries.

Rosario has emerged as a key leader in city politics whose name comes up in mayoral aspirations. For now, he says, he likes his influential state legislative role.

Bradley and Rosario can leverage their legislative influence, and standing in Bridgeport, to gain the governor’s attention. We’ll see how this shakes out in the coming months.

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16 comments

  1. Local Eyes is never blind to the facts.
    The Hispanic vote was coincidental and not deliberate. Rosario and Bradley are taking credit for something they didn’t produce and seeking a return on an investment they didn’t make. “What’s in it for me” sounds too greedy at this early stage. Wouldn’t it be great if Reps Rosario and Bradley sponsored a bill that balanced Connecticut’s budget before they requested a quota?

  2. Oh? So what are we saying here? That the new Governor should turn a blind eye to the needs of Blacks and the small 22% of Caudasians, who have lived here for generations and who built this city, and cater ONLY TO THE NEEDS OF HISPANICS, many of whom have only been here for one generation and many of whom aren’t even citizens?

    Is that what you call “diversity” ?????

    1. First of all,I know I have met PavlickinTheNorthend. He is a “good guy” that is trying to make a living in the Greater Bridgeport Community. I respect his comments,welcome his comments as I welcome ALL the comments made here on OIB. Diversity of comments makes for an interesting discussion here on OIB.

      1. Condos do pay for their rubbish removal according to my Condominium Board. In fact, now that almost half of the condos are rental units and people are not abiding by maximum occupancy rules with 6-8 people living in one bedroom condo units, the dumpsters have to be emptied twice per week now at double the cost, which is built into our commons charges. Likewise our water and sewer bills are astronomical because far more people are living here than are supposed to ! And of course the non-resident landlords just don’t care.

  3. We’re not talking State Politics here. We are talking about Bridgeport, with it’s 22% Minority Caucasian population that hasn’t a hope of ever being represented in either Bridgeport politics or in THEIR needs being met. Quite a large number of these people are Senior citizens on fixed income, who pay heavy real estate taxes used to educate the City’s 25,000 students; some of these students being citizens while many are not.

    Seniors receive little to nothing in public services themselves,.Many of them, who live in condominiums don’t even get the free rubbish removal or snow plowing that renters around the City get, while paying no property taxes at all. Condominiums which are highly taxed are considered private property and receive no City services. Condo dwellers have to pay for private rubbish removal and snow removal !

    Many Seniors do not or cannot drive automobiles and are in need of cheap and accessible public transportation. But bus routes have been cut way back and many bus stops done away with, making it impossible for Seniors to have easy access to busses. And the NEMT or Non Emergecny Medical Transportation program is only available to Medicaid patients and not to Medicare Seniors. Likewise, the Post Office has removed most of the public mailboxes from street corners, making it difficult even to mail a letter.

      1. Not according to my Condominium Board. In fact, now that almost half of the condos are rental units and people are not abiding by maximum occupancy rules with 6-8 people living in one bedroom condo units, the dumpsters have to be emptied twice per week now at double the cost, which is built into our commons charges. Likewise our water and sewer bills are astronomical because far more people are living here than are supposed to !

        1. Condominiums pay residential property taxes, therefore they receive one pick-up a week from the City.

          If they need more than one, they must hire a private company and pay for it out of the common charges.

  4. To be honest,I am uncomfortable with this parsing of ethnic voting groups(whites,browns-latinos etc,blacks—–).n Yes,different “communities” respond to different answers to different questions but there is the cliche(many times truthful) A RISING TIDE LIFTS ALL BOATS.

  5. I need to reach out to Ron Mackey,Donald Day and whomever. In my previous post on this OIB posting, I had difficulty reaching an appropriate label for “African-Americans” “blacks” etc. what would be the most appropriate ethnic label.

  6. Frank, you know Ron and I aren’t everything Black. Anyway as you can see my preference is and has always been Black. There is no politically correct answer or one answer for everyone. I always understood that a white person from South Africa who became a USA citizen could claim to be an African American and they would be figuratively correct. I hope that helps you in some kind of way.

  7. Frank, here’s another point to go along with what Don said, “African-Americans” reference the land base of the person, there is no country called black or negro.

  8. I wish I was Senate chair of the Public Safety Committee because here’s what I’d do: First, I’d get on the map. Connecticut is late. Success depends on gambling velocity. The best way to increase gambling velocity is to exploit contract law and include a micro-insurance policy with each ticket. This way we encourage repeat business because their dollars go further here! We’re in competition with 49 states and our pint-sized neighbor is cleaning our clock!

    ESPN tells the story here:
    http://www.espn.com/chalk/story/_/id/19740480/gambling-sports-betting-bill-tracker-all-50-states

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