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Supporters Serenade Finch As He Segues To Life’s Next Chapter

November 22nd, 2015 · 64 Comments · City Politics, News and Events

Finch, Dolphin's Cove

Mayor Bill Finch listens to supporters at Dolphin’s Cove. CT Post photo Autumn Driscoll.

Friends, supporters, politicians attended a sendoff for Mayor Bill Finch Saturday afternoon at Dolphin’s Cove in the East End, a short distance from the Steel Point redevelopment area featuring anchor tenant Bass Prop Shops that was recruited and opened on Finch’s watch. Nov. 30 will be Finch’s last day as mayor after eight years in office.

More from CT Post reporter Alex Gecan:

U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., stopped by as well, and seconded Ayala’s thoughts on mayors and Steel Point.

“Mayor’s the toughest job. If you’re attorney general as I was, or you’re a senator, they don’t like you in Bridgeport, you go to Hartford. If they don’t like you in Hartford, you go to Simsbury. They don’t like you in Simsbury, you go to Cromwell or Stamford or Greenwich,” said Blumenthal. “But if you’re mayor, you’re there. You can’t run, you can’t hide.”

Steel Point, the senator said, had drawn national derision as a proof positive that Bridgeport was going nowhere slowly–but the neighborhood was no longer a “punchline.” On top of that, he said, Fairchild Wheeler Interdistrict Magnet School, the recently reopened Pleasure Beach and ongoing alternative energy projects would stand as monuments to Finch’s years as mayor.

Full story here.

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64 Comments so far ↓

  • Donald Day

    I think having only 80 people there to say goodbye and job well done is a little sad. That comes to ten people a year who felt you did a good job and you heard their cries. This turnout speaks volumes to the kind of mayor he was and how or whether he touched his constituents.

  • John Marshall Lee

    Donald,
    There is often sadness when people are departing, isn’t there? It’s an emotional signal that change is happening and things will not be quite the same.

    But isn’t that what an election is about anyway? Maybe such departure ceremonies would be observed by a larger group if those in the community had felt they were RESPECTED? RESPONDED to? INCLUDED in the story-line when cameras were not present? TOUCHED, as you put it, in the heart that a leader has placed honesty in his words and deeds and personal integrity as non-negotiable personal values to instill or restore trust and respect for public office? Was that the message of the last eight years? And as a newly recycled leader is about to step onto the Bridgeport stage, is it that type of leadership that is hoped for? Time will tell.

  • Steven Auerbach

    I thought community activist Jessica Martinez did a wonderful job putting together an amazing departure for Mayor Finch. I do not think an invitation went out to a thousand people. Donald Day you are extremely naive and pathetic to suggest 80 people was the best attendance that could have been there. We do know for a fact you were not invited. This was put together by a very caring average citizen and cost money. This was not a fundraiser. This individual most likely does not earn what you get in a city pension and you do not live in Bridgeport. Putting things in perspective, your candidate did not get 1000 votes during the primary. Mayor Finch did not lose by a landslide in the primary. This was an intimate gathering of friends invited by Jessica Muñiz Martinez to say thank you to Mayor Finch and his family. Bass Pro around the corner is one of his crowning moments and people are talking about Finch up and down the State. The speeches at the function were heartfelt. The food was all homemade and it was truly a lovely sendoff. There were Ganim and Torres supporters there and maybe three Foster supporters who wanted to crash the party and show respect. Otherwise it was a private little gathering that was actually bigger than expected. I saw quite a few OIB bloggers there. After the party, I stopped off at Bass Pro to see a few friends and watch them bowl and have a cocktail. Mayor Finch’s contribution will be fondly remembered with memories of Steelpointe, Downtown, new schools, parks and recreation and everything Finch antagonists objected to will be embraced lovingly by Mayor Ganim. I just can’t wait for the new Hotel, Cineplex, Housing, Harding High School and train station Ganim may cut the ribbon on. I know Joe Ganim made a beautiful speech the night of the election asking for his supporters to reach out to those who voted otherwise. Let’s see how that plays out. We do not want Ganim to have a very short honeymoon. We do hope he succeeds. There is no need to look backwards and make up horror stories of past administrations. None of them will compare to the man who won the race. We forgive and move on or vote him out!

  • Robert Teixeira

    Day, how many people showed up when Ganim left office in his first mayoral tenure? Finch gave Bridgeport much-needed integrity after Bridgeport’s corruption scandal. To be fair to Joe, when he took office people didn’t even want to drive through Bridgeport, never mind shop or eat in Bridgeport (unless you lived in, or worked in Bridgeport). Bridgeport came a long way from when Joe first became mayor, and Finch did some things to build Bridgeport’s positive reputation and redemption. Bass Pro is not a store geared up for urbanites. So if a store like that can bring in people from other towns to Bridgeport, it can only mean Bridgeport doesn’t have the reputation it once held, from a business and consumer standpoint. When you put the man or woman before the city, you’re actually undermining Bridgeport. Now Joe has an opportunity to show how a broken-down, blighted, corrupt, poverty-stricken city can redeem itself. One must ask, did Joe corrupt Bridgeport or did Bridgeport corrupt Joe?

  • Donald Day

    What does where I live have to do with my love for Bridgeport? I’ve done more for the uplift of Bridgeport than you could in the next 50 years. I’m personally responsible for over 40 blacks, Latinos and women becoming firefighters and I ran those study groups while living outside the city. I’m personally responsible for over 40 blacks, Latinos and women reaching elevated rank within the fire service and I did that while living outside the city. If I did nothing else just imagine how many lives and generations I’ve changed just by helping those people get a job that will transform the lives of them and their families as well as those who got rank and more money for reaching elevated rank.

    But I didn’t stop there, I put together the idea and concept for preference points for Bridgeport residents. I put that in a PowerPoint program and gave it to councilman Don Clemons to present to the city council. It passed the city council unanimously and I did that while living outside the city.

    What in hell have you done other than work on elections? I never felt the need to work on elections because it didn’t matter who was in office because doing the right thing isn’t a campaign promise, it’s a moral obligation that every mayor should prioritize. That was done until Finch became mayor, when he became the liar that would cost him this last election. You’re right, I wasn’t invited, and conventional wisdom should tell your ignorant ass I wouldn’t have attended under any circumstances.

    • Ron Mackey

      Donald, what Mayor Finch should have understood but he didn’t just like Robert Teixeira and Steve Auerbach don’t understand is blacks have a keen awareness and history of their voting rights and Bill Finch as mayor thought he knew better than the voters and he decided to take their voting rights away from them for who should run the Bridgeport Board of Education. That action alone made black voters to make sure they came out to vote “against” Bill Finch. Think about that and the history of blacks not having the same ability as whites to vote in America and Mayor Finch touched a bad nerve. There should had been a line waiting to get in and to tell Bill Finch goodbye. Liar is the best word that I think tells the saga of this mayor as he leaves office.

      • Steven Auerbach

        To Donald Day and Ron Mackey–the two spokesmen for blacks–did you advise Mary-Jane Foster? Did you imagine there were no black people supporting Mayor Finch? Black Black Black do you guys ever get tired of it being a black issue? Ganim is a most likable guy but no black people in my neighborhood voted for him. What’s more, they know I will support his efforts. They will not. Would you please tell my black neighbors to embrace their blackness and support Ganim because it is the “black” thing to do? I know I was a minority at the Finch party and I didn’t realize I was a minority until I responded on this blog. It was a black and Hispanic kumbaya party for Finch. I guess the hostess invited a few white crackers to make Mayor Finch and his wonderful family feel more at home. Even the amazing soul food reflected the guests. I am always thankful when people remind me I am white. I sometimes forget. If I run for office I will ask Donald Day and Ron Mackey about how I should deal with the black community. I think their record on how they advised Mary-Jane Foster speaks for itself. Back to Finch, he has dramatically changed our city. Now we hope Joe Ganim can fill his shoes. The voters and taxpayers are more interested in results than his going into run-down impoverished areas making people feel good when their neighborhoods were more rundown in the 12 years Ganim was Mayor. So we move forward. We wish Mayor Bill Finch good luck and best wishes. Thank you for the sacrifice and moving our city forward. For all of the developments. For those who choose to not acknowledge the parks, schools, green mentality, gentrified downtown and Steelpointe, that’s okay. Sometimes ignorance is just bliss, sometimes it is just politics. Bridgeport is better for having eight years of Mayor Finch. I wish Ganim a successful run.

    • Steven Auerbach

      Donald Day, I think you are an ignorant ass also!

  • Robert Teixeira

    Day, if your post is directed at me, I think you misunderstood it. I asked you a question on how many supporters were at Ganim’s departure when he left office. That’s it. I just thought it was unfair to Finch. As far as the rest of my post, it was a general observation on how far Bridgeport has come. Ron, Finch did what he did and he’s at were he’s at. As far as blacks having it harder or being suppressed, it’s through the BOE. I heard Bridgeport has a 50% dropout rate. If a person can’t read or write there’s is no high-paying job them whatever race they are. Government isn’t the only employer in America. To put in a category of supporting black suppression is truly unfair, and it might be a little racist. If you read any thing I ever wrote or even knew me, you would know it’s far from the truth. Why Bill wanted Bridgeport mayor’s office to have control over the BOE I don’t know, Ron, but lets say he did win in having the mayor’s office gain control over the BOE. Do you think blacks would be better severed in the Bridgeport education system under Ganim: who would have control of the BOE when he is sworn in on Dec 1?

    • Robert Teixeira

      To put me in a category of black suppression is racist. Now Steve on the other have, yeah he seems racist. Just kiddin’ Steve. You’re not racist. You’ll kiss any mayor’s ass. We just didn’t elect a black mayor yet.

      • Steven Auerbach

        Robert Teixeira, are you an ass or what? Do you even realize how ignorant and insulting your post was or is your filter not working? Let’s see, if my memory serves me correctly, you were a Ganim supporter until they threw you out of their campaign headquarters and then you became a Finch supporter. Yes that sounds about right. Didn’t they want to get the cops to get rid of you? Kissing ass? I do not have a position where I would have to do such things.

        • Robert Teixeira

          Yes, that sounds about right. What can I say, I’m a people person, :) mistakes were made. I’m asking Joe for a second chance. No, I’m not kissing ass, I’m more like a sycophant. PS, it was a joke. Steve, do you work for the city?

    • Ron Mackey

      Robert, have you or anyone in your family been denied the right to vote? Robert, blacks have fought and died in every war America has had but they didn’t have the legal right to vote until 1968. Even after that they still had barriers put up to block their right to vote. But when Mayor Bill Finch said, “democracy doesn’t always work” as his reason for his attempted takeover of the BBOE, Robert, think about that one.

      • Robert Teixeira

        Technically it is democracy. You vote for the mayor. How many appointed positions does a mayor have? A Mayor runs a city. What is undemocratic about having control to appoint BOE members Finch is not politically savvy. He should have been, the BOE is failing Bridgeport students, most blacks are dropping out and those who graduate can’t read or write. The election of board members is a system and needs to be in the hands of the City of Bridgeport Mayor’s office. The Mayor and his administration will be held accountable for education the students that has so many blacks and minority students under the current way board member are now appointed. Ron if you were to be vocal about blacks being underserved, focus on the BOE. As the voting is concerned you and Day said it was the black vote that is why Finch lost. Democracy works. It’s like beating a dead horse. Finch is out, Ganim’s in and the black students are still dropping out and graduating behind the school systems.

        • Ron Mackey

          Robert, I’m talking about what is and Bill Finch didn’t do what you wrote and he paid the price for that and should be glad a black President Obama came to Harbor Yard just before the election in 2011 to get voters out to vote.

          • Robert Teixeira

            You asked me if I or my family were ever denied the right to vote. You talked about how blacks fought in every American war. You take aim at Finch for not doing enough (I’m not making a case if did or didn’t, I don’t know). But the reason he won the black vote was because a black President came to Bridgeport to persuade black voters to vote for Finch. Do you see the black and white issue here? If Bill didn’t do enough for blacks and you’re advocating for blacks, make the case. Your posts are like the KKK attack flyer Bill sent out during his reelection bid. I still think your focus should be on the education system.

      • BOE SPY

        Ron–you mean 1869, not 1968.
        “Robert, blacks have fought and died in every war America has had but they didn’t have the legal right to vote until 1968.”
        You are only talking about wars before the civil war. That would be the war of 1812 and the revolutionary war.

        • Ron Mackey

          © The Oxford Companion to American Military History 2000, originally published by Oxford University Press 2000.

          African Americans in the Military. Americans of African descent have participated in all the wars of the United States, serving their country and themselves, for military service has offered African Americans a means of economic, social, and political as well as military advancement. Black participation thus must be understood in the context of the importance of racial issues that developed as early as the colonial era, issues that have shaped the unique expansion of African Americans in the American military.

          During the colonial period, the largest numbers of free blacks were in the northern colonies. These colonies were much more willing to include Americans of African descent in their militia than were the southern colonies, which held the majority of slaves, although some colonies used blacks in labor units for militia expeditions. But in cases of dire need, even colonies like South Carolina, where slaves greatly outnumbered whites, would arm slaves to fight in exchange for their freedom, as in the victorious campaign against the Yamasee Indians in 1715.

          Following the 1739 slave revolt in Stono, South Carolina, however, most of the colonies excluded all blacks from military service. Laws for black exclusion were repealed in the North for freed blacks and often overlooked in the South, where despite the official policy of exclusion, free Americans of African descent were still armed during conflicts with the Indians and the French, and even slaves served as scouts, wagoners, laborers, and servants.

          In the American Revolution, African Americans served with the New England “Minute Men” at Lexington and Concord and helped fire the “shot heard ’round the world.” Although blacks had served in the colonial wars before the revolution and still served in northern militias, when the Revolutionary War began in 1775, they were not at first welcomed into the Continental army because of the influence of the slave states in the new national government. It was not until after November 1775, when the British started to recruit blacks into their forces, that African Americans were officially allowed to join the Continental army. By 1776, faced with increasing shortages of volunteers, Gen. George Washington disagreed with the Continental Congress and declared that he could depart from the resolution that barred participation by blacks. Because Congress did not challenge Washington’s action, more than 5,000 Americans of African descent served in integrated units in the Continental forces. Most of the southern states officially refused to use blacks in the military except as laborers, but in practice, some Southern black slaves were sent as substitutes. African Americans participated in many battles, including those of Bunker Hill, New York, Trenton and Princeton, Savannah, Monmouth, and Yorktown.

          • BOE SPY

            Wars before 1776 were not American wars. They were British wars. No one could vote in Britain. They were a monarchy, not a democracy. As far as American wars blacks fought in while they could not vote, there were 2-1/2. The revolutionary war is a toss up. That was a revolution. British versus British. We were not Americans until we won that war.

          • Ron Mackey

            BOE SPY, really, Crispus Attucks was the first casualty of the Boston massacre, who is widely considered to be the first American casualty in the American Revolutionary War, March 5, 1773 but I guess that doesn’t count and oh yes, he couldn’t vote because he didn’t have that right because he was black.

    • Steven Auerbach

      Robert Teixeira, Joseph Ganim will have no control over the Board of Education other than the budget. I am not sure you are aware of that.

      • Robert Teixeira

        Steve, I know nothing, I’m a idiot but I’m fair. And that cracker remark is racist. You’re a racist, you hate white people.

        • Steven Auerbach

          Yes Robert, I admit I hate white people. I am trying to get over it but it is tough. Those white crackers need a little peanut butter to make them palatable.

          • Robert Teixeira

            I can call you a racist, but you draw the line at kissing up to the mayor who won and you campaigned against. Everybody is racist, it is to what extent. Well except for me, I hate everybody. :) Except Mayor Joe. :)

          • Steven Auerbach

            Robert, the terms kissing up, fawning, sycophant and obsequious are definitely descriptive. The person with these characteristics, of which there are many in this city, depict individuals who brown nose or suck up or kiss up seeking personal gain or a raise or personal favor. I have never been the beneficiary of any political favor. I love those on this blog who confuse me with other bloggers. I support Ganim simply because it is the right thing to do. On Finch’s campaign I worked with city employees making serious salaries. I was not one of them. How pathetic to include me in this lot! I was working to save their jobs, not to protect my own. Therefore, when I compliment a candidate it is genuine. When I attack it is warranted. Kiss ass? I can give you a list of them. My name is not on it. For the record, there were only two politicians who ever did anything for me. Thomas Bucci, I served on the commission for Historic Black Rock and Mary Moran. No other Mayor has ever done a thing for me, just to set the record straight!

      • Robert Teixeira

        Steve, what do you do? And you said you had an appointment with the Mayor. Is that true? If so, for what? What do you want from him?

    • John Marshall Lee

      Robert,
      What would school success look like to you as a taxpayer or as a voter? If you have a child or grandchild in public school today, what would represent a successful trend to you? Are taxpayer citizens provided with a constant set of goals with regular measurements provided by those on the BOE? Have BOE members set out such goals in agreement with the Superintendent of Schools with the necessary funding to pursue those goals? Are things always changing with emphasis on personalities or trends beyond our control, rather than looking at where $300 Million gets spent annually? And when you count grants and school building funds as well as operating budgets for education in the past 10 years you will see the “education establishment” in the City will have spent about $4 Billion in that time on salaries, building new plant, equipping the buildings, etc., etc. What have we been tracking to see if we are getting our money’s worth? A 50% dropout rate seems a poor result. Is it accurate or are there other measures, defined and understood by all stakeholders that will give us a better grasp of what is at stake? Time will tell.

      • Robert Teixeira

        Success is dropout rate going down like crime. The students able to read and write a a level where they could attend college and compete with other students from surrounding towns. The BOE felt the need to change Columbus Day but I bet they are still teaching his discovery in school.

        • Robert Teixeira

          As those who read my blog, I’m a prime example of the Bridgeport School System. As you can see, like me it needs improving. Luckily for me I’m a people person. :)

  • Jimfox

    I’m going to miss the dialog between Mayor Finch (MF) and Mrs. Finch (MRS. F).

    Good luck, Mayor Finch!

  • Lisa Parziale

    Robert, when those of us fought so hard to prevent the BOE takeover and to insure the right to vote for BOA members as opposed to them being appointed by Finch, it was not just to stop Finch. We realized that would open the door for future mayors to do the same. We were not shortsighted in our goal.

    • Phil Smith

      Finch deserves criticism for the attempted BOE takeover. But he’s not the first Mayor to propose an appointed BOE. That was a fellow named … Joe Ganim.

      • Robert Teixeira

        Phil, Joe did that? Maybe he’ll finish what he started along with Steel Point. Great, now I like Joe again. Thanks Phil. Go Joe. :)

      • Steven Auerbach

        I totally supported the appointed BOE. So Finch failed at it, maybe Ganim will succeed after he asks permission from his BOE guru. Not sure who is on that transition team or not!

      • Lisa Parziale

        Phil, if he thought about it he had the good sense not to pursue it because the outcome would have been the same as Finch’s. Our BOA needs to get back to the business of our children, and if they don’t, they’ll be fired by the people. No Mayor or City Council should interfere with the voters’ right to choose.

  • Robert Teixeira

    Lisa, my points are just observations. I’ll stick to Marie, when she said it’s about a 300 million dollar budget and who controls it. But no one is disputing Bridgeport’s school system is failing. It’s not all their fault. I’m sure the household has something to do with it also. At some point you have to break the cycle of a 50% dropout rate. What is the illiteracy rate for the other 50%? I don’t really see a difference, if you elect a mayor who appoints the board members, or you elect board members on a mayor’s ticket. However there is no accountability of the board or its members, but if the mayor appointed them, the mayor will be held accountability for their failures and rewarded for their success. A $125,000 job is quite a motivator in making sure the board members are succeeding in educating the students. How much does a board member get paid to be on a board? If it’s not a lot then what is their motivation for success? I’m not into politics so I really don’t know the answers to my questions, but I have some common sense. What can Joe or any other mayor do to help the education system, besides funding, because that’s all you ever hear. These numbers could be wrong, ballpark I think. $300,000,000 budget/20,000 students = $15,000 per student per year. What is the amount of money needed to teach 20,000 students to read and write and have the stills necessary to stay out of prison? Which costing CT $31,000 per person, per year. Most people who live in Bridgeport don’t even make that much working. There are whole economies built on people suffering. like Cancer, they don’t want to cure it, just slowly kill you while keeping the health industry prosperous.

  • Mojo

    *** You can be sure the 80 or so people present at the going-away party were handpicked; family and close friends, along with pro-Finch city employees, the city council president and selected council members along with political backers who gained something during Finch’s eight years in office, no doubt! The average city resident’s name was not on the guest list and the city P/O at the door made sure no uninvited guests got in to say goodbye, no? ***

    • Steven Auerbach

      Actually Mojo, those who cashed in on Finch’s eight years were not there. This was a party hosted by Jessica Martinez. The individuals in question were not there. Average citizens and well wishers as well as some politicians were there. This was not a Mayor’s guest list. This was a supporter’s private party.

  • Mojo

    *** Let’s see and ponder some of the Finch accomplishments during his eight years as Mayor of Bpt! Pleasure Beach water taxis to a deserted beach that 1/3 is a wildlife sanctuary for piping plovers, another third for fishing and the rest for sunbathing, wow! And let’s not forget it was Don Clemons’ interest first, back when he was on the city council and later on the state legislation which was instrumental in getting the state funds for Pleasure Beach. Moving on, Fairchild Wheeler School, which was already one of the schools to build on the Bpt School Building Committee’s list during the Fabrizi Admin. Steel Point, which has been on the city’s drawing board since the Ganim and Fabrizi years on and off, with developers and funding finally approved and groundbreaking started during the Finch Admin. with major city deals made with Bass Pro, Starbuck and Chipotle to get the ball rolling. City brownfields funding gotten from the State to make neighborhood parks and playgrounds in different areas of the city. Funding for candlelight “stop the violence” city marches at night in the Park City! Rise in all city service permits, park stickers, fines, tows and personal property taxes, mil rate, etc. Overfunding late city services contracts and paying out millions in city suits. And let’s not forget the funding of the Chiefs of Police and Fire Dept’s retirement while they’re still working! Oh, how about all the nepotism type, high-paying city political jobs? And let’s wait and see how many outgoing political contract jobs before Finch leaves office, no? *** WHOOP ***

    • Robert Teixeira

      But let’s not forget the 2008 global financial crash this country hadn’t seen since the 1929 crash. What’s up with all the hate?

      • Ron Mackey

        Robert, are you sure you are not Steve Auerbach in drag because you sound just like Steve. Mojo just gave a portion of a list of things concerning Bill Finch but you still won’t accept the facts.

        • Steven Auerbach

          Ron Macky do you really believe your or Mojo’s perception of the Finch years represent all of his accomplishments? Which brings me back to Mary-Jane Foster. As her supporter, what percentage of her 1100 votes came from the black community? Did Mayor Finch have support from the black community in the primary? Whether you believe Finch accomplished anything or not, on paper it is pretty impressive.

        • Robert Teixeira

          What is a crash not happen? A list of accomplishments. That’s one of my points. Ganim did big things with big money. The economy was booming. It’s easy to get things done when you have funding. Finch governed during a depression. Your hatred for Finch, for whatever he did to you (maybe personally) is blinding you, I think.
          www .youtube.com/watch?v=k58WnJOanZQ
          (Why do you see the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? 4 Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ when there is the log in your own eye? 5 You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother’s eye.–JC)

  • Mojo

    *** Well they’re not exactly nice political accomplishments to be proud about, however this past Mayor must take the good with the bad, no? ***

  • Andrew C Fardy

    There are two people I blame for the failure of Bill Finch’s mayoralty. The people I blame are Paul (flush) Timpanelli and John Stafstrom. Between these two idiots Finch ended up with two of the nastiest mayoral aides imaginable. Unfortunately Finch’s terms will be remembered by the nastiness of Nunn and Wood. These two shitheads set the tone for the past eight years.

  • Andrew C Fardy

    I hope Joe Ganim surrounds himself with smart educated people who know Bridgeport. I also hope these hires are people friendly. The people of Bridgeport have had enough of the bully tactics employed by Wood and Nunn. I think it’s time to send that divisive arrogant asshole John Stafstrom on his way. Let Stafstrom’s law firm eat at some other public trough, other than Bridgeport. Joe, good luck to you in the next four years and I say that even though I don’t like you.

  • Jmar2230

    Steve, thank you so much for perfectly describing how beautiful, heartfelt and intimate the Mayor Finch and family celebration was. The JFK theme, my friend Mayor Bill Finch’s idol, truly hit the spot. I didn’t even realize it was the day before his assassination. Oh, the way God aligns things is just marvelous and perfect.

    I would say, the attendance was more like a grand total of 150 if you want to include the Bassick High Jazz band and the Keys band, that came to support.

    My mission accomplished and we all left that night filled with love, happiness, thankfulness, hopeful and blessed. Bridgeport is filled with tons of dynamite people. Once the video and pics are completed maybe I can send them to Lennie. I’m sure these bloggers with tons of free time are interested in seeing a legacy being honored and the love shared.

    Funny, I used to get angry at all the ignorant comments, then I would crack up at how amusing they are to read but now I am alarmed and saddened that we have so many uninformed, uneducated and ignorant. Hence the reason why Ganim even had a chance of winning again but I won’t even get into that. Maybe it’s time I devote an hour or two a week to start informing and educating you all on truths. Or maybe I’ll start my own blog … hmmm!!!

    Oh and please people drop the black-racist comments!!! Stop always making it a black thing. This coming from a Puerto Rican who has mixed nieces and nephews. I am far from racist but it all gets me sick, the racism that still exists and those individuals who still use it as a crutch. Fyi: Bridgeport is multicultural and Mayor Bill Finch had and has a HUGE supporter base in the community! Let’s be very HONEST here we all know he did NOT lose that primary election, if you think that than you’re more clueless than I thought.

    Ignorance is bliss to those who want to fool you!

    Thank you,
    Jessica Martinez

    • Ron Mackey

      You sound like one of those self-hating persons of color. You choose not to look at the voting list to see the makeup of the voters in Bridgeport so try educating yourself and you’ll see how and why JFK, I mean Bill Finch lost.

    • Steven Auerbach

      Btw Jessica, congratulations on your election! 1500 votes is very impressive. Surprisingly more than Mary-Jane Foster did in the primary. I wish you great success! BTW I just got my application today for the NAACP! Very excited! I know I will be one of many white Jews who are members. I just thought I’d mention it. :-)

      • Ron Mackey

        Steve, you and the NAACP; wow, what a team. You couldn’t deal with issues about blacks on OIB so how in hell are you going to deal with those issues at an NAACP meeting? You will be a no-show member but they will accept your dues.

    • Ron Mackey

      Jessica Martinez, you live in a City where over 70% of the voters are people of color but you said, “please people drop the black-racist comments.” You are really out of touch, just listen to Donald Trump, watch any sports program with a panel or any political talk show and educate yourself. Maybe you should join John Marshall Lee and Steve Auerbach and become a member of the NAACP.

  • Andrew C Fardy

    What made you all-knowing? Here is another winner from your comments, “we have so many uninformed, uneducated and ignorant” people out there. This is according to you? Forget it.

  • Mojo

    *** Just because you like Finch does not mean everyone should as well! You have your reasons and others have theirs, no? ***

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