Preserving The Bassick Name And School

Justin Parks at Bassick High School in Bridgeport. March 25, 2019. Photo by Linda Conner Lambeck.

From Linda Conner Lambeck, CT Post:

While the $115 million Bassick High School replacement project inches forward, members of the family the school is named after have stepped forward to make sure their good name–if not the 90-year-old structure itself–is preserved.

“I would be concerned if the whole thing was taken down, but of more importance to me–and I think to the family–would be the beautiful parts and certainly the name,” said Justin Parks, the great-grandson of industrialist Edmund Chase Bassick.

Parks was born in Bridgeport, grew up in Fairfield and now lives in Norwalk. He said he realizes he has come into the discussion to tear down the current school and build a new one late, but hopes it is not too late to have an impact.

“It may already be a fait acompli,” he said.

Full story here

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10 comments

  1. It would be nice to salvage the exterior of the old school and incorporate it in the exterior of the new school. At least this why the architect can be enjoyed by all that view it instead of being hidden in a court yard that will not be use for the most part. JS

  2. Thanks for the comments about my family and the Bassick High School. Edmund Chase Bassick was a remarkable man and soldier of fortune. The current school building is a true historic landmark in Bridgeport and should be preserved . Yes, it needs to be refurbished but when finished, it will be continue to be an architecture and building masterpiece and not just a new school.

    1. Justin,

      The Bassick name will remain because when your ancestors transferred the 8 acres to the City, the land records clearly state it was being done so for a “Bassick School.” It is written into the deed.

      Let’s stay focused on working with those in the Bridgeport community who have supported a comprehensive renovation of your family’s tribute to your great grandfather and preventing demolition of one of the most beautiful public schools ever built in America.

      Those who laughed, sneered and snickered while I read former City Historian, Charles Brivlitch’s, accurate and comprehensive portrayal of your ancestors, their achievements and amazing contributions to Bridgeport, and the architectural and historic significance Bassick High School are not who should be engaged as part of you and your family’s efforts.

      Please trust me on this.

  3. The original structure was built in a court yard setting. Houses lined Clinton Avenue and the homes back yards faced the school because Ernest G. Southey wanted the school protected from dense housing and the busy streets of Clinton and Fairfield Ave. It was purposeful.

  4. Mr.Justin Parks.

    As Presidents of the Bassick School Parent Committee, I want to inform you that I, my parents, teachers and the community, have never wanted to remove Bassick’s name from school. If we want a new school and for the best future for our students and those of the future. I guarantee that, Bassick’s name will always be present at school. I and my parents, teachers, past and present administrators and the community will always be grateful for what the Bassick family did for us and the future of the students of the first day and the present and the future.

    Any question please it would be an honor to talk with you or your family. I am always at school in my office, room number 164 at the Bassick Parent Center

    Thank you very much for your support and your valuable time.

    Mr.Albert Benejan
    PTSO President of Bassick High School.

  5. Court yard setting, Please. 🙂 To save the building’s architectural design that has any meaningful impact of its architecture importance. It can’t be an enclosed court yard where the original entrance is not utilized as it was intended. A four sided court yard building design will defeat the purpose of the building architectural importance, which is the most important aspect of the building that is worth saving. So why save it if it’s going to handicap the over-all school value? You are trying to save the grand facade entrance of a build that will not be utilized as an entrance. If the design that save the building where the entrance stay and is utilized as it was intended, where the old building entrance stays as an entrance. I can have a better understand. What are you really trying to say? At the and of the day it’s about value. and it’s a push (being kind) if what you are trying to save is not really being saved, called an entrance, people, Show me a design where you save the grand architectural entrance that stays as an entrance. If it doesn’t you re really didn’t saved it. just encased it in enclosed court yard tumb. JS 🙂 Court yard setting. LOL 🙂

    1. Spell check version. 🙂

      Court yard setting, Please. 🙂 to save the building’s architectural design that has any meaningful impact of its architecture importance. It can’t be an enclosed court yard where the original entrance is not utilized as it was intended. A four-sided court yard building design will defeat the purpose of the building architectural importance, which is the most important aspect of the building that is worth saving. So why save it if it’s going to handicap the over-all school value? You are trying to save the grand facade entrance of a build that will not be utilized as an entrance. If the design that save the building where the entrance stays and is utilized as it was intended, where the old building entrance stays as an entrance. I can have a better understand. What are you really trying to say? At the end of the day it’s about value. and it’s a push (being kind) if what you are trying to save is not really being saved, called an entrance, people, show me a design where you save the grand architectural entrance that stays as an entrance. If it doesn’t you’re really didn’t save it. just encased it in enclosed court yard tomb. JS 🙂 Court yard setting. LOL 🙂

  6. I have seen the plot plan from the late 1920’s. The front of Bassick faced the backyards of the homes lining Clinton Avenue.

    Architect Ernest G. Southey wanted the school setback on the property for privacy, and to keep the hustle and bustle of the busy streets away from the learning sanctuary Bassick school was intended to be.

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