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Ganim, Ganim & Ganim, P.C.



Bass Hooks Ganim For Interview, ‘The Dangers Of Politics …They’re Watching You’–Ganim: They Should

August 24th, 2017 · 3 Comments · Analysis and Comment, News and Events, State Politics

Bass, Ganim

Screen shot of Paul Bass interview with Ganim.

Why go back into politics where the feds could be watching you? OIB friend Paul Bass, editor of the New Haven Independent and host of Dateline New Haven on the affiliate radio station WNHH, interviewed Mayor Joe Ganim on Thursday covering numerous topics including his comeback, running for governor, public financing of campaigns and sanctuary cities. Bass asks why reenter the scrutiny of public service and put yourself in a position where the feds could be watching everything you do? Ganim responds matter-of-factly, “And they should.”

With 10 minutes remaining in the interview Bass illustrates the twice-convicted former Connecticut Governor John Rowland as a jump point for querying Ganim about reentering public service with all the potential trap doors. Here’s part of the exchange.

“It’s hard for me to get into anybody else’s mind,” says Ganim. “When I came back I had no preconception about wanting to do anything but put my life back together again.”

“You’re going back into politics again with some dangerous waters,” responds Bass.

“No question.”

“And it puts you at risk of going back to jail again … (The feds) could be watching everything you do.”

“And they should.”

Bass declares for some people, including himself, the notion of going to jail is terrifying. Who needs it even if you do nothing wrong?

A seasoned interviewer, Bass has an easy way of asking a hard question. And it leads to the sometimes stoic mayor revealing more about himself in this interview.

New Haven’s high-volume urban vote is key if Ganim’s going to gain traction in his 2018 run for governor. New Haven, like many cities across the state, will be a frequent stop. Ganim’s campaign relevance depends largely on public financing which they touch upon in this interview. The State Elections Enforcement Commission has rejected Ganim’s request to participate in the Citizens Election Program of publicly financed campaigns because of his 2003 public corruption conviction. The fund for qualifying gubernatorial candidates provides more than $1 million in a primary and about $6.5 million in a general election.

Ganim is challenging the decision in federal court on constitutional grounds.

If his court challenge fails, and he pursues a statewide run, he’d have to raise money the old-fashioned way through large personal contributions placing him at a sizable money disadvantage.

Ganim discusses this and other topics with Bass. See full interview above and highlights here.

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3 Comments so far ↓

  • The Bridgeport Kid

    Joseph P. Ganim is a convicted felon. As such he does not qualify for public campaign funds.

    His license to practice law was revoked. A panel of three Superior Court judges upheld the disbarment after finding he had not been truthful, had not expressed remorse for his crimes and pretty much denied personal responsibility. “The devil made me do it” wasn’t enough fto convince the Honorable Barbara Bellis nd her associates on the court.

    People are right well fed up with “corruption as usual” politics. We are fed up with a mayor and City Council that serves one master and not the business of the people of the city of Bridgeport. If the state and national Democratic Committess had any vision they would be grooming a candidate to challenge Ganim in the next mayoral election cycle.

    The American people are suffering fatigue from Trump and GOP inertia on Capitol Hill. The Democratic Party will likely regain control of at least one Chamber of Congress, most likely the House of Representatives. The GOP has been hijacked first by the Tea Party then the so-called “freedom caucus,” political organizations that place ideology above the needs of the American people. All Donald Trump wants to do is build a wall and repeal healthcare benefitscfor 30,000,000 of his sheep-like followers. They love him for it.

    The state Democratic leadership ought to view this as an opportunity to clean house in Bridgeport, Waterbury and other cities with chronic corruption issues. the Bridgeport DTC is long overdue for a regime change. Too many municipal departments are larded by individuals whose only qualification is an aunt, uncle, cousin, godfather or other kin was owed a favor by Mario Testa. (If Ganim is serious about balancing the city budget he will be able to free up a sizeable chunk of money by firing all thesecincompetents.)

    Stop playing with the police department’s pension fund. Cops in Bridgeport have a tough job that they perform admirably. Without them the city would fall apart.

    • Ron Mackey

      You made a very good point when you wrote, “His license to practice law was revoked. A panel of three Superior Court judges upheld the disbarment after finding he had not been truthful, had not expressed remorse for his crimes and pretty much denied personal responsibility. “The devil made me do it” wasn’t enough to convince the Honorable Barbara Bellis nd her associates on the court.” Joe Ganim should have made a statement on either the Wednesday after the election or that following Sunday at Rev. Stallworth’s church and he should taken personal responsibility and expressed remorse for his crimes but Joe couldn’t do that because that’s to much like being a man and a true believer in the word of God. Ganim will continue to pay a price for never coming clean about what he was in federal prison for. 

  • John Marshall Lee

    “When I came back I had no preconception about wanting to do anything but put my life back together again.”
    If a man sees his life goals become separated whether because of personally bad choices, external traumatic events, falling prey to addictions, or catastrophic health consequences it is timely and appropriate to attempt to re-order his life. In Ganim’s case he chose to pursue a path of “public service” once again. Interesting choice because the public has not seen “different” priorities that help all of the people, a more open approach that show practical community concern and accountability, and a transparency in governance that allays the fears and misgivings of folks who have suffered out of touch and uncaring community leadership. That starts at the top and in this City that means The Quiet Man who shows up when he cares to, says little, is accountable to no one, yet those who wish to truly “serve the people of the community” must have an interview with him and forever after be loyal?? Does the City Charter really direct that activity, Dan Roach? Is it true that City personnel care more about what Mario is thinking about them than Civil Service, Human resources, labor relations, or their own supervisors? Is accountability to Mario’s unspoken word the Golden Rule in the City for employment? What if the City outsourced some responsibilities and workers to see if got better service and efficiency at lower expense? What departments might you look at to gain better accountability, deliver more efficient service, and cut budget appropriations? Suggestions, please? Time will tell.

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